Posted by: laughs4dads | July 12, 2010

My Wife Speaks

Although I have this blog, I’m not the only one in my family who has written about our daughter growing up.

My wife, Barbara, kept a journal, starting from when Casey was about six months old and continuing, albeit with entries of rapidly decreasing frequency, until she (Casey) passed her driving test.

I read through it recently, and discovered a few wonderful nuggets of wisdom.

On child safety:
“I had to take (her mobile) down yesterday when I found her standing up in the crib, with her head among the strings…The mobile is history, which makes me sad, as it means she’s growing up and I’ll be losing my baby soon. But she could strangle herself, and I’d rather have a live toddler than a dead infant.”  Mark’s note: As parents, we often have to make tough choices.

On why Casey was initially afraid of dogs:
“I fear dogs, as when I was little my grandmother used to spend a lot of time with me.” Mark’s note: I never met Barbara’s grandmother, but I’m sure she was charming.

On whether you should enroll a child with a “late birthday” or wait:
“Today was Gymboree. Only two more classes. I have to decide what class to put us in next semester…The next class is supposed to be for 10 months olds. Casey will be 8 months, but she’s so advanced.”   Mark’s note: She even took Advanced Placement Duck Duck Goose.

On her father selling her childhood house (a year after her mother’s death):
“Dad wants to move with no furniture, wants to start a new life with a clean slate. So we kids have to decide what we want. What if we throw something out that we decide we wanted? Tough luck. Dying sure creates a lot of problems.” Mark’s note: Another reason to choose the live toddler over the dead infant.

On important developments:
“Lots of new developments. Casey (at 10 months old) now actually brings both hands together when clapping. She’s learnt to spit real well, too.”  Mark’s note: Unfortunately, she was too young to audition for Titanic.

About my side of the family:
“By the way, Mark’s grandfather is still alive, so his mom is neurotic as ever.” Mark’s note: My grandfather has since passed on, and mom’s not any less neurotic.

About Casey’s first words:
“She sounds like she’s black, saying ‘mo’ for ‘more.’ Her tongue probably has to become more adept at bending or something.”  Mark’s note: If you’re African American, please don’t take this the wrong way.  Barbara is referring here to an inner city dialect, not a racial stereotype.  However, if you are among the minority group with unbending tongues, feel free to be offended.

On spoiling children:
“I bought Casey a pail and shovel. She loves sitting in the sand and digging. Previously we have just borrowed other people’s. This year she deserves her own.” Mark’s note: I do not remember going through a period of abject poverty during which we would not have been able to afford a pail and shovel.

About nursery school:
“I was very disappointed with the open house. The teacher treated us like the 2 year olds our kids are. We did not learn anything we didn’t already know.”  Mark’s note: Yes, Barb and I were already acquainted with animal sounds.

On potty training:
“The other problem I’m having is getting her to make a B.M. on the toilet. Except for this small little detail, she is completely potty trained.” Mark’s update: Casey, at 23, is no longer B.M.-impaired.

On garage sales (that I used to take Casey to):
“To me it’s buying someone’s old junk. I’d much rather have new junk.”  Mark’s note: Barbara really enjoys that “new junk smell.”

On her own journal:
“The other night on Thirtysomething, one of the characters started a diary for her baby and it was in the form of letters. Should I start writing this journal like that? I guess not because I started it this way.”  Mark’s note: Barbara is a terrific mother and a wonderful wife. Her writing could use some work, though.

Share

Advertisements

Responses

  1. HAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: